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As Time Goes By

As Time Goes By

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Ref: CDG1218

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Sophisticated Songs from the 40s

A set of gentle standards which sound as slick and sophisticated today as they did when they were first heard and played during the decade of the Second World War. Imperishable ballads and artists lit up the dark days of the war and brought joy to millions of listeners around the world.

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Sophisticated Songs from the 40s

A set of gentle standards which sound as slick and sophisticated today as they did when they were first heard and played during the decade of the Second World War. Imperishable ballads and artists lit up the dark days of the war and brought joy to millions of listeners around the world.

1 I can't begin to tell you Bing Crosby
2 I'll get by Harry James & Dick Haymes
3 As time goes by Dooley Wilson
4 Together Dinah Shore
5 That lovely weekend Vera Lynn
6 Stormy weather Lena Horne
7 It had to be you Helen Forrest & Dick Haymes
8 I don't want to set the world on fire The Inkspots
9 Sophisticated lady Duke Ellington
10 Besame mucho Jimmy Dorsey
11 Laura Dick Haymes
12 Moonlight in Vermont Margaret Whiting
13 Serenade in Blue Pat Friday, Ray Eberle, The Modernaires, Glenn Miller
14 I'll be with you The Andrews Sisters
15 Our love affair Judy Garland
16 The one I love Frank Sinatra
17 Among my souvenirs Louis Armstrong
18 I know why Glenn Miller
19 At last Ray Eberle
20 Lili Marlene Marlene Dietrich

CCL CDG1218
Cover image: National Railway Museum/SSPL
This compilation p & c 2005 Classical Communications Ltd
Made in Great Britain

Inside book:

As Time Goes By
Sophisticated Songs from the 40s

When the Second World War began in September 1939, the Swing Era was about to enter the second half of its ten-year reign. As the Thirties darkened with, in Churchill's memorable phrase 'the lights going out all over Europe', popular music was going from strength to strength. The golden age of popular song dovetailed into a freer, more extrovert form of music primarily designed for dancing and to become generically known as 'Swing. The top swing bands not only maintained but also increased their popularity during the war years and the bright, vivacious music they played was the perfect antidote to the chaos going on all around. Theatres, ballrooms, records, cinema and radio provided diversions for both the forces and civilians.

Radio had really become, for most of the population, its chief source of entertainment. Many established names owe their popularity to the wireless. Bing Crosby was a crooner who could really sing - with style, as well as technique and feeling. His tone and phrasing were unmistakable, the overall technical approach inimitable. He became, and still is, a 'household' name. His sound held an emotional wartime appeal for listeners in Europe and the rest of the world and it was due, essentially, to radio. Much the same can be said of another great artist, Vera Lynn who will always be known as 'The Forces' Sweetheart. The Thirties saw the rise of the vocal group and their close harmony stylings were ideally suited to the sweeter, polished romantic ballads that were becoming popular. Of course, there were exceptions and The Andrews Sisters were very much a by-product of swing, but one of the most celebrated of close- harmony groups, The Ink Spots, has left us a legacy of 'classic' recordings one of which we have included on this Collection.

The end of the war in 1945 coincided with the demise of swing. Its ten years had seen no radical musical development and yet its influence would reach out beyond its years and one can link the arrival of rock 'n' roll some ten years later as part of swing's inheritance. The romantic ballad still held its ground and did not sound substantially different to pre-war ones (the arrival of the aforementioned rock n' roll in the mid-1950s would provide a radical change) Frank Sinatra and Dick Haymes were part of the vanguard of new ballad-singing heroes. Sinatra's contribution to popular music was as outstanding as it was immeasurable. There is little doubt that he was the most influential popular singer of the twentieth century. The same legendary status can be applied to Judy Garland who, like Sinatra, brought a highly individual approach to her singing.

As Time Goes By; Stormy Weather; I'll Get By; Besame Mucho; It Had To Be You; Moonlight in Vermont; Lili Marlene…it is a list of destined-to-be 'standards' that reads like a soundtrack to the times. Why not sit back, enjoy and remember the imperishable ballads and artists that lit up an unforgettable decade.


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