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Bandstand

Bandstand

Ref: CDG1129

20 tracks 72 min
Click here to preview trk 3
A musical walk in the park

Strolling along on a Sunday afternoon, we can hear the band in the bandstand playing favourite melodies and musical highlights from the world of stage and screen. Superb musicaians create a sparkling evocation of the world of the brass band.

Price    9.99

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Bandstand
A musical walk in the park
Strolling along on a Sunday afternoon, we can hear the band in the bandstand, playing favourite melodies and musical highlights from the world of stage and screen. Superb musicians create a sparkling evocation of the world of the brass band.

1 Soldiers in the Park (Oh Listen to the Band) Lionel Monckton
The Band of The Corps of Royal Engineers
2 Country Gardens Percy Grainger
The Minden Band of the Queen's Division
3 Londonderry Air Traditional arranged DF Wall
The Band of The Royal Corps of Signals
4 'Pearl Fishers' Duet (Deep inside the sacred temple) Georges Bizet arranged Morgan
The Band of The Corps of Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers
5 Marche Militaire Franz Schubert arranged Denis Burton
The Band of the Corps of Royal Electrical &Mechanical Engineers
6 Barwick Green (The Archers) Arthur Wood
The Minden Band of the Queen's Division
7 March from Little Suite (Dr. Finlay) Malcolm Arnold
The Western Band of the Royal Air Force/The Western Big Band
8 Nessun Dorma Giacomo Puccini arranged K Crook
The Band of the Prince of Wales Division (Lucknow)
9 Nimrod Sir Edward Elgar arranged PR Evans
The Band and the Fanfare Trumpeters of the Corps of Royal Engineers
10 Carnival of Venice Jean Baptiste Arban arranged Hunsberger
The Band of the Royal Air Force College
11 Elizabethan Serenade Ronald Binge
The Minden Band of the Queen's Division
12 Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves (Nabucco) Giuseppe Verdi arranged Morgan
The Band of the Corps of Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers
13 Fantasia on Greensleeves Ralph Vaughan Williams arranged PE Hills
The Band of the Grenadier Guards
14 I Vow to Thee My Country Gustav Holst arranged C Payne
The Regimental Band 16th/5th The Queen's Royal Lancers
15 Thunder & Lightning Polka Johann Strauss
Massed Bands of the Household Division
16 Pineapple Poll - opening Sir Arthur Sullivan arranged Charles Mackerras
Kneller Hall All-Stars Band
17 Salut D'Amour Sir Edward Elgar
The Minden Band of the Queen's Division
18 By a Sleepy Lagoon Eric Coates
The Minden Band of the Queen's Division
19 Flower Duet from Lakmé (BA Theme) Leo Delibes arranged Alexander
The Band of The Corps of Royal Electrical &Mechanical Engineers
20 1812 - Overture: finale Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky arranged Hannam
The Massed Bands of the Guards Division


CCL CDG1129
This compilation P & C 2005 Classical Communications Ltd
All tracks courtesy of Bandleader Recordings
Cover image: The Bandstand Edward le Bas (1904-66), Sheffield Galleries and Museums Trust, UK/www.bridgeman.co.uk
Programme notes by Martin Moritz
Made in Great Britain

For further information on The Gift of Music range of high quality CDs, please ask for a catalogue or visit our website: t: 01865 882920, www.thegiftofmusic.com



inside book:

Bandstand
A musical walk in the park

One of the joys of summer is listening to a band in the park. Seated on the bandstand, bedecked in their smart uniforms and led by a commanding, straight-backed conductor, they regale us with familiar musical fare that invariably ranges from gentle nostalgic favourites to rousing marches.

The history of bands with community-related links can be traced back as far as the eleventh century in Europe. It was then the custom for night-watches to patrol the streets and walls and guard the gates of towns and cities. The members of these patrols were known as waits and were supplied with horns that were used to signal the passing of time and for sounding warnings. The shawm was particularly useful because of its carrying power.

Gradually, over time, these watchmen developed a trade-related pride, becoming adept at playing a range of instruments that included strings. They continued to be used for security purposes but they also took on the role of community musicians required to perform at ceremonial duties and festive duties within their particular town or city.

These municipal musicians began to exploit their talents beyond their remit. An additional source of income could be gained from unofficially serenading guests at inns and taverns (a practice still familiar today when passengers disembark from their cruise liners to be welcomed by bands playing). Performing at Christmas could also prove lucrative although this would have probably been a civic requirement.

The waits survived as late as the 1830s, a period that ushered in the Industrial Revolution. In musical terms, it saw the introduction of valves, improvements in instrument manufacture and, later, the arrival of a range of instruments designed by Adolphe Sax.

The Industrial Revolution would change people's lives, particularly those of agricultural workers who would have to re-locate to growing industrial areas. These workers found it very difficult to conform to their new life-styles. Used to a more relaxed, open-air environment, they now had to endure cramped conditions with none of the social advantages that a rural life would offer.

However, concerned mill, colliery and foundry owners, aware of their workers' predicament, provided the funding for recreation and entertainment by sponsoring works' bands. Not all bands were work-related with some being formed through public subscription so as to brighten their lives by having music and the inherent community pride that bands would engender.

Apart from civic duties that included playing at town fairs and garden parties, as well as the more formal opening ceremonies and commemorative events, bands would also play at local parks where the public could listen to them at their leisure. They would receive payment either through the park owner (which would usually mean the civic authorities) employing them over a season for a number of public performances for a set fee, or from collections at the venue itself from the members of the public listening. These two traditions still apply today, despite the inclement weather of a typical British summer.

We hope that our programme will recreate the atmosphere and enjoyment of those concerts in the park that have delighted us over the years.


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