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Drivetime Jazz

Drivetime Jazz

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Late Night Jazz

Ref: CDG1217

20 tracks, 65 min
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Rhythms for the Road

Sound the horn and clear the road! Cheery jazz classics to make your journey seem shorter - or to blow away the frustrations of the traffic jams and congestion of modern motoring. The jazz greats are here: Armstrong and Hawkins, Bix and Benny, Bessie and the Duke, with the rhythm you need for that drive!

Price    9.99

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Rhythms for the Road

Sound the horn and clear the road! Cheery jazz classics to make your journey seem shorter - or to blow away the frustrations of the traffic jams and congestion of modern motoring. The jazz greats are here: Armstrong and Hawkins, Bix and Benny, Bessie and the Duke, with the rhythm you need for that drive!

1 Doin' the voom voom Duke Ellington
2 Take me for a buggy ride Bessy Smith with Buck and his Band
3 Waiting at the end of the road Bix'n'Bing with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra
4 Harlem river quibble Duke Ellington
5 Shimme-sha-wabble Louis Armstrong and his Band
6 Tailspin blues Jack Teagarden & The Mound City Blue Blowers
7 Saint Louis shuffle Coleman Hawkins with Fletcher Henderson and his Orchestra
8 Harlemania Duke Ellington
9 Washington wobble Duke Ellington
10 Two tickets to Georgia Jack Teagarden with Ben Pollack and his Orchestra
11 '39-'25-'39 Coleman Hawkins with Billy Byers and his Orchestra
12 Sugar Foot stomp Coleman Hawkins with Fletcher Henderson and his Orchestra
13 Wherever there's a will, there's a way (my baby) Coleman Hawkins with McKinney's Cotton Pickers
14 T'aint so, honey, t'aint so Bix'n'Bing with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra
15 King Porter stomp Benny Goodman
16 Snug as a bug in a rug Artie Shaw & his Orchestra
17 Milenberg Joys Louis Armstrong and his Band
18 Where the blues were born in New Orleans Louis Armstrong and his Band
19 One o'clock jump Benny Goodman with Count Basie
20 From Monday on Bix'n'Bing with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra
21 West End blues Louis Armstrong and his Band

CCL CDG1217
Cover image: The Open Road 1930/Mary Evans Picture Library
This compilation P & C 2009 Classical Communications Ltd
Made in Great Britain

For more etc

Inside book:

Drivetime Jazz
Rhythms for the Road

Our album of historic recordings opens with 'the indispensible' Edward Kennedy Ellington - called 'Duke' by his friends on account of his aristocratic manner and elegance of dress - whose recording career began in 1927. He was already a mature artist by then. 'The Washington wobble' was recorded at one of the earliest of his recording sessions, a hallmark of which was the special bass sound of his band: present and full, and achieved simply by moving the bassist (Wellman Braud) closer to the microphone! The band's trumpeter, 'Bubber' Miley had been playing regularly with the Duke for more than 3 years by then, primarily in New York's Kentucky Club at 49th and Broadway. His artistic influence on the Duke is clear in recordings such as 'Doing the voom voom'.

Bessie Smith has one of the most striking jazz voices of all time: it's not pretty, but it packs a punch and her strong personality is very clear, aided by strong diction and immense clarity. Many of her recorded songs focus on a strong narrative with a solid blues rhythm, as she played to her technical strengths. 'Take me for a buggy ride' comes from her last recording session, made in New York in 1933.

Paul Whiteman was often called the 'King of Jazz'. He worked with some of the best jazz musicians he could find: one of his skills was in putting great artists together in his famous orchestra. Around Christmas 1926 in Chicago, Whiteman signed up Bing Crosby. Early in the following year Bix Beiderbecke joined too, pleased to take up a place with Whiteman after other, smaller-scale musical ventures had folded. Bix and Bing hit it off from the start: 'One of the great thrills of my life, working with Bix - we both took our work seriously but we enjoyed it. I used to try and sing like he played…he was a great talent, with a superb ear and real style…it was one of the best things Whiteman did, signing him'.

Louis Armstrong was also already a star in the 1920s and was a major act at the Cotton Club in the 1930s. He was continually bothered in his early days by legal and financial wrangles which were not resolved until he found the right agent, Joe Glaser, who straightened out the mess and started to put Armstrong together with other fine musicians. Armstrong played regularly from the late 40s with Jack Teagarden as part of the 'All Stars' group. He played the trumpet and sang with that famous gravelly voice.

Coleman Hawkins is often acclaimed as the 'inventor of the tenor sax'. His distinctive staccato style earned him many plaudits, but he could also play in a legato, melodious way too, like an instrumental 'singer'. Artie Shaw was a professional musician by the age of 15: when he made 'Snug as a bug in a rug' he was still only in his twenties. Benny Goodman studied classical clarinet in Chicago as a boy before crossing decidedly over into the world of jazz, although he made exactly the opposite move later in life and worked with some of the greatest classical composers of the day such as Bernstein and Copland. He worked with Armstrong for a while, although (perhaps because of his classical leanings) he rejected the more showy aspects of Armstrong's stage performances.


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