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Good Sport! - SAVE £7

Good Sport! - SAVE 7

Ref: CDG1261

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Nostalgic music for the armchair athlete

Saturday afternoons on the terraces, the thwack of leather on willow, warm beer and boating, a day at the races: all are conjured up by this nostalgic and entertaining album of sporting musical favourites from bygone times. We kick off with the 'Grandstand' theme and call time a whole hour later!

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Good Sport!
Nostalgic music for the armchair athlete

Saturday afternoons on the terraces, the thwack of leather on willow, warm beer and boating, a day at the races: all are conjured up by this nostalgic and entertaining album of sporting musical favourites from bygone times. We kick off with the 'Grandstand' theme and call time a whole hour later!

1. Grandstand Robert Farnon & QHLO*
2. Cruising down the river Russ Morgan
3. Waita poi Peter Dawson
4. Gone fishin' Bing Crosby &Louis Armstrong
5. Goodwood gallop Robert Farnon & QHLO
6. The canoe song Paul Robeson
7. Sid plays golf Sid Field & Jerry Desmond
8. Football fanfare Roger Barsotti
9. Yacht race Jack Beaver
10. Play the game, you cads The Western Brothers
11. Saturday sports Wilfrid Burns
12. Sportsmaster Robert Busby
13. Daisy belle Orchestra Mascotte
14. Sunny days Layton & Johnstone
15. Ascot enclosure Peter York
16. Lucky day The Revellers
17. All Sports March Robert Farnon & QHLO
18. International Sports March Sidney Torch & QHLO
19. The sport of kings, introducing Underneath the arches Flanagan & Allen
20. World series Robert Farnon & QHLO

*QHLO = The Queen's Hall Light Orchestra

CCL CDG1261
This compilation P & C 2004 Classical Communications Ltd
Cover image: French football poster National Football Museum, Preston/Bridgeman Art Library
Made in Great Britain

Good Sport!
Nostalgic music for the armchair athlete

Sport is our national pastime. We watch more sport today than we have ever done and sportsmen and women have supplanted the roles traditionally held by pop stars and entertainers. We treat them as Gods and it seems that every schoolboy aspires to be a David Beckham and, latterly, a Jonny Wilkinson. We take our sport seriously. It is a matter of national pride and with our winning the Rugby World Cup in November 2003, we are now imbued with a confidence and a patriotic fervour not seen since that other World Cup win in 1966.

'The Beautiful Game', as it is known across the world, was first organised in England in the first half of the nineteenth century. There were a number of versions of the game, each with different rules. Yet by the end of the century, it had become a controlled and regulated game. Association Football was an important achievement of Victorian England. The movement began in the public schools. They took the traditional mob scrimmage and turned into a game of remarkable skill. It then spread to the universities and then to London where amateur clubs took it up and, eventually, launched the English 'Cup'. From London it then moved to the North and Midlands and it was from these areas that the first professional clubs emerged. There was less professional interest in the South at the end of the century.

Soccer became an international sport and it was a game that at which we could beat foreign teams. By 1920, it had developed into a much faster game. The new Wembley Stadium, opened in 1923, drew crowds in specially provided trains from all over England who were 'up for the cup'.

The first recorded cricket match was played in Sussex in 1697. In 1719, the first 'county' match was played, with the Londoners (Middlesex) playing against the Kentish side. It gained popularity in the southern counties but became transplanted to the London grounds of wealthy patrons. Lord's Club was begun in Dorset Square, London in a private cricket field by Thomas Lord, a Yorkshire man who bowled for the club. In 1813, it was moved from its second location in St. John's Wood to its present one.

Golf can trace its origins to a game played in Fife in Scotland during the fifteenth century. Players would hit a pebble around a natural course of sand dunes, rabbit runs and tracks using a rough stick. Golf's status and popularity spread throughout the next century due to royal endorsements. Charles 1 popularised the game in England and Mary, Queen of Scots, who was French, introduced the sport to France whilst she was studying there. Golf today is truly a global game and the names of Palmer, Player, Nicklaus, Watson, Faldo and Woods have become 'household' ones.

Our music Collection is sure to revive many memories of days of watching and, indeed, listening to our favourite sport. Before television, it was radio that supplied all the thrills and spills and we have included a number of signature tunes and themes that will transport you back to the Forties and Fifties. Happy Listening!


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