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Late Night Jazz

Late Night Jazz

Ref: CDG1195

20 tracks 64 min
Click here to preview trk 15

Our second jazz collection is deliberately easy listening; relaxing and enjoyable, with strong melodies and a gentle swing. Sinatra, Holliday, Ella, Nat and many more stars in possibly the ultimate fantasy night club programme! Relax into the small wee hours with numbers like Sweet Lorraine, or enjoy April in Paris, and dream a little dream with Armstrong.

Price    9.99

More Information

Late Night Jazz

Our second jazz collection is deliberately easy listening; relaxing and enjoyable, with strong melodies and a gentle swing. Sinatra, Holliday, Ella, Nat and many more stars in possibly the ultimate fantasy night club programme! Relax into the small wee hours with numbers like Sweet Lorraine, or enjoy April in Paris, and dream a little dream with Armstrong.

1 Sweet Lorraine Frank Sinatra
2 You go to my head Billie Holliday
3 Laura Nat King Cole
4 But not for me Ella Fitzgerald
5 September in the rain George Shearing
6 Skylark Billy Eckstine with Earl Hines
7 One for my baby (and one more for the road) Frank Sinatra
8 September song Sarah Vaughan with Teddy Wilson
9 April in Paris Coleman Hawkins
10 Out of nowhere Lena Horne with Teddy Wilson
11 I can't get started Nat King Cole with Lester Young
12 Any time, any day, anywhere Lee Wiley with Joe Bushkin &
Buddy Hackett
13 I'll never be the same Billie Holliday with Teddy Wilson
14 Taking a chance on love Billy Eckstine with George Shearing
15 Dream a little dream of me Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong
16 My old flame Peggy Lee with Benny Goodman
17 Lover man, oh where can you be Sarah Vaughan with Dizzy Gillespie
18 Deep in a dream Connie Boswell with Woody Herman
19 Yesterdays Stan Getz
20 No moon at all Nat King Cole


CCL CD1189
Cover image: Cafe at Night 1971 Pierre Eychart (20th century) Private Collection, J.P. Zenobel /The Bridgeman Art Library
p & c 2008 Classical Communications Ltd
Made in Great Britain

Even in its rate of development, jazz is truly the music of the 20th century. It is hard to believe that this music, in all its awesome diversity, is only a century old. It has a long and complicated history, full of gods and heroes, saints and martyrs. Diversity, though, can create confusion. The word 'jazz', once so simple and direct, now describes many sounds, many kinds of musical thought. Browsing through a record shop or looking at the forthcoming attractions in a local club, it is hard to know what kind of music will result when this 'jazz' attraction or that one takes the stand.

Jazz is indeed a unique mode of expression. For the first, and arguably the only time, in the history of modern Western music, the performer and the composer are united as one, creator and interpreter fused in a single unit. The result is an expansive musical culture, international, with a virtuoso tradition admired around the world; a degree of artistry truly amazing in its scope and diversity. Its past is constantly uniting with its present to fuse an ever-changing future, with every new artist the sum of everything that's gone before. Ultimately, the jazzman is telling us not about somebody else's feelings and experiences, but his own, and, through our understanding, ours.

For a music that was at first seen as reactionary but became accepted on its own terms, it is sobering to realize just how much jazz infiltrated and influenced the mainstream of popular music. Nat King Cole made a smooth transition from jazz pianist to become one of the most outstanding popular singers of the 20th century. Frank Sinatra imbued his singing with an innate jazz feel, an inheritance from his time with the Tommy Dorsey band. Stan Getz could bring his talent to the world of the Bossa Nova in the early 1960s and one did not feel uncomfortable in the process.

The music on our collection of Late Night Jazz is relaxing, enjoyable listening; melody plays a prominent role and it gently swings. Angry, rebellious sounds can be heard elsewhere. The recordings featured here date from that late 1930s through the 1940s - a period that coincides with what is generally regarded as The Golden Age of Popular Song. From around 1930 to 1950, many of our greatest 'standards' and evergreens were written. These years saw popular music's most celebrated composers producing their finest work. Our program features such illustrious names as Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Vernon Duke, Gus Kahn, Hoagy Carmichael, Johnny Mercer, Kurt Weill and Harold Arlen. And consider for a moment the list of artists represented here: it reads like a "Who's Who" of popular music, from the soulful stylings of Billie Holiday to the soft, gentle sound of George Shearing; from the deep, rich voice of Billy Eckstine to the elegance of Lester Young; from the unique pairing of Ella Fitzgerald with Louis Armstrong to the swinging ease of Frank Sinatra.


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