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The Gift of Music, Keswick House, Branthwaite Road, Workington, Cumbria, CA14 4ED, United Kingdom.

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Latin Beat - SAVE £8

Latin Beat - SAVE 8

Ref: CDG1209

WAS £9.99 - NOW £1.99

14 tracks 55 min
Click here to preview trk 1

Dance, dance, dance! This music will have you moving in no time, its infectious good humour blowing away all the cobwebs. We may not all be TV stars, but we can all still enjoy the style and rhythm of this great music. Evocative titles and fast paced music bring the sounds and scents of the real Cuba to life.

Price    1.99

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Latin Beat

Dance, dance, dance! This music will have you moving in no time, its infectious good humour blowing away all the cobwebs. We may not all be TV stars, but we can all still enjoy the style and rhythm of this great music. Evocative titles and fast paced music bring the sounds and scents of the real Cuba to life.

1 La habana vieja
2 One black bean
3 Sugar cane
4 Pelicano pelicano
5 Scuba dive
6 Scent of Mariposa
7 1920s blend
8 Hills of Oriente
9 Onward to Cabo Maisi
10 Fusion
11 Sun still shines
12 Big belly palm
13 Ride the rhythm
14 Hitchhike

CCL CDG1209
Cover image: 1950s car driving past 'Viva Cuba' billboard, Ian McKinnell, The Image Bank/Getty Images
P & C 2008 Classical Communications Ltd
Made in Great Britain


Latin Beat

Religion and politics have been an overriding influence on the music of Cuba, much, in fact, in the same way that the church and state were important drivers of music in Western Europe from the origins of polyphony in the cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris onwards, although many of the musical outcomes have been very different!

Cuban music has its roots in Spain and West Africa, and its musical forms and styles evolved initially through the cultural influences of the cabildos, a type of social club brought to the island by African slaves. The cabildos were essential elements in the survival of African cultural traditions, including music and rhythm, even after the Emancipation of the late nineteenth century, when the people were taught to adopt many of the ideologies of the Roman Catholic church. For a hundred years or so, Cuban music developed in its own way and was little known beyond the island's shores. The success of the Buena Vista Social Club in the late 1990s changed all that for ever! Now we all know and love the rhythms and style of Cuban rumba and salsa, and we all want to dance!


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