0844 248 90600844 248 9060

The Gift of Music, Keswick House, Branthwaite Road, Workington, Cumbria, CA14 4ED, United Kingdom.

My Basket

Items:  items
Value: 

Santa Claus is coming to Town

Santa Claus is coming to Town

Ref: CDG1243

Click here to preview trk 1

Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without a visit from Santa! This lovely musical celebration mixes the velvety tones of Bing Crosby and Nat King Cole singing nostalgic songs with choirs and other famous voices singing traditional carols. Perry Como, Judy Garland and Gracie Fields and many more raise their voices in the true spirit of Christmas.

Price    9.99

More Information

Santa Claus is coming to town
Nostalgic Songs and Carols

Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without a visit from Santa! This lovely musical celebration mixes the velvety tones of Bing Crosby and Nat King Cole singing nostalgic songs with choirs and other famous voices singing traditional carols. Perry Como, Judy Garland and Gracie Fields and many more raise their voices in the true spirit of Christmas.

1 Bing Crosby Santa Claus is coming to town
2 The Squadronaires Winter Wonderland
3 Bing Crosby White Christmas
4 Nat 'King' Cole Frosty the snowman
5 Archie Lewis Silent night, holy night
6 The Andrew Sisters Christmas Island
7 The Fleet Street Choir While Shepherds Watched
8 Cyril Grantham I'm sending a letter to Santa Claus
9 Gracie Fields Christmas Love
10 St Bernard's C.D.S. Choir The First Noel
11 Royal Choral Society God rest ye, merry gentlemen
12 Bing Crosby Jingle bells
13 Primo Scala The mistletoe
14 Perry Como There is no Christmas like a home Christmas
15 Nat 'King' Cole The Christmas Song
16 Dick Haymes O little town of Bethlehem
17 St Bernard's C.D.S. Choir Good King Wenceslas
18 Anne Shelton Away in a manger
19 Deanna Durbin O come, all ye faithful
20 The Squadronaires Picnic in the snow
21 Dick Haymes Joy to the world
22 Celebrity Quartet Hark, the herald angels sing
23 Bing Crosby Twelve days of Chrstmas
24 Bing Crosby Here comes Santa
25 Judy Garland Have yourself a merry little Christmas

Original recordings

CCL CDG1243
Cover image: Santa filling stockings Courtesy of The Advertising Archives
P & C 2010 Classical Communications Ltd
Made in Great Britain

Santa Claus is coming to town
Nostalgic Songs and Carols

For many of us, Christmas would not be Christmas without Bing Crosby. He, after all, gave us one of the greatest and timeless of all Christmas favourites White Christmas. Bing introduced this Irving Berlin classic in the 1942 film 'Holiday Inn' and to date it has sold well over 42 million copies. It remains just as fresh and charming today. Bing's partnership with the Andrews Sisters resulted in a string of melodically rich and high-spirited recordings in the 1940s. They are clearly enjoying themselves in four perennial favourites. Santa Claus is Coming to Town was written in 1932 by Haven Gillespie and one J. Fred Coots, veteran composer for Broadway and the legendary Cotton Club revues; An American schoolteacher, James S. Pierpoint wrote Jingle Bells in 1857 for a Sunday school entertainment. For youngsters then , one of their happiest activities was 'riding in a one horse sleigh' (the tune's original title); Gene Autry, a familiar name from 'Westerns', co-wrote Here Comes Santa Claus in 1947 and in the 16th century when The Twelve Days of Christmas was probably first sung, it was a custom for the well-to-do to exchange gifts on each of the 12 days of Christmas.

Now to four lovely carols that each reflect a soft and contemplative aspect of Christ's birth. Archie Lewis sings Silent Night, composed in 1818 by Franz Gruber, an Austrian choirmaster. He wrote it to be performed with guitar accompaniment as the organ in his local church needed repair. Dick Haymes recalls O Little Town of Bethlehem, dating from 1868, when the words were written by Bishop Philips Brooks of Philadelphia, and the melody by his organist Lewis Henry Redner. First published anonymously in 1885, Away in a Manger, sung most appealingly by Anne Shelton, had its melody added some ten years later. And the dignity of The First Nowell, a traditional carol, is perfectly captured by The St .Bernard's Choir.

To complement the mood of the above four carols, five wistful songs. A classic song in a classic recording: the velvet voice of Nat King Cole will forever be linked with The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire), that marvellous evocation of an old-fashioned Christmas, co-written by Mel Torme. Another much-missed singer, Perry Como sings There's No Christmas Like a Home Christmas, written by Carl Sigman and Mickey Addy and recorded in 1950. One of the most tender moments in the 1944 film 'Meet Me in St.Louis' was Judy Garland singing Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, written by those veterans Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane. It has become one of the most enduringly popular of all Christmas songs. From 1939, the inimitable Geraldo and his vocalist Cyril Grantham bring us a beautiful ballad I'm writing a Letter to Santa Claus, composed by Spencer Williams and "Our Gracie" Gracie Fields sings a delightful Walter Ridley composition Christmas Love.

The triumphant side of Christmas is well represented in our programme. Hark! the Herald Angels Sing, with a melody by Felix Mendelssohn and words by Charles Wesley, is joyfully sung by The Celebrity Quartet. The Royal Choral Society, in a vintage recording, remind us just what a superb ensemble they are with God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen, the roots of which can be traced back to the 16th century. Another traditional carol While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks originated in Dorset whilst the words were adapted from the Gospel to St.Mark. The Fleet Street Choir, remembered from the 1940s, perform magnificently. The benevolence of a medieval Bohemian monarch is enshrined in Good King Wenceslas sung here by The St. Bernard's Choir. Two favourite singing stars bring their contributions to these tidings of joy. Deanna Durbin, everyone's film sweetheart, is in typically superb form, with O Come , All Ye Faithful, a 17th century carol that had English words added by Frederick Oakeley in 1782 and Dick Haymes sings Joy to the World, with a noble tune probably written by Handel.

Two cheerful songs from the late 1940s in two cherished recordings are what Frosty the Snowman and Christmas Island share. The former, written by Jack Rollins and Steve Nelson, is given an affectionate rendition by Nat King Cole and the latter, composed by Lyle Moraine, feature The Andrews Sisters, who sing this number with humour and charm.

Finally, two great names from the golden age of British dance bands with three nostalgic mementoes: The Squadronaires with Winter Wonderland and Picnic in the Snow and Primo Scala and Mistletoe Kiss.


Recently Viewed