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Songs for a Head Gardener

Songs for a Head Gardener

Ref: CDG1094

21 tracks 62 min
Click here to preview trk 2

Jolly songs and music for gardening

A light-hearted collection of music with a gardening theme. The scene is set with 'The sun has got his hat on' and the album continues with some great songs of the past, including 'Floral Dance', 'Trees', and 'Love in bloom'.

Price    9.99

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Songs for a Head Gardener
Jolly songs and music for gardening

A light-hearted collection of music with a gardening theme. The scene is set with 'The sun has got his hat on' and the album continues with humourous moments and some great songs of the past, including 'Floral Dance', 'Trees' and 'Love in bloom'.

1. The sun has got his hat on Ambrose and his orchestra with Sam Browne
2. Sparrow in the treetop Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters
3. Singin' in the rain Cliff Edwards
4. Floral dance Peter Dawson
5. Sittin' on a five bar gate Jack Payne
6. Woodman, spare that tree Phil Harris
7. The biggest aspidistra in the world Gracie Fields
8. Don't fence me in Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters
9. Ol'buttermilk sky Connee Boswell
10. A little white gardenia Al Bowlly
11. Trees Paul Robeson
12. Mighty lak' a rose Jane Powell
13. Love in bloom Bing Crosby
14. April Showers Al Jolson
15. Let it snow! Let it snow! Let it snow! Russ Morgan with Connee Boswell
16. Sweet violets Radio Revellers
17. Orange coloured sky Betty Hutton
18. Painting the clouds with sunshine Johnny Marvin
19. San Antonio Rose Bing Crosby
20. Stormy weather Kay Starr
21. Heat wave Ethel Waters

CCL CDG1094
This compilation P &C 2004 Classical Communications Ltd
Image courtesy of The Advertising Archives
Programme notes by Martin Moritz
Made in Great Britain

For further information on The Gift of Music range of high quality CDs, please ask for a catalogue or visit our website: t: 01865 882920, www.thegiftofmusic.com


Songs for a Head Gardener
Jolly songs and music for gardening

Whether it is a box, back-lot, allotment or lawn, gardening is now so much a part of our way of life. For every out-of-town supermarket, there is a garden centre or village with a range of flowers, blooms and plants on hand to satisfy the needs of the amateur and more ambitious gardener. There is a battery of standard and exotic tools available plus a myriad array of other necessary paraphernalia to keep you occupied for hours. And we must not forget the ubiquitous gnomes whose fixed expressions should liven up even the most drab of gardens. On TV, we are seemingly bombarded with personalities who usually come armed with colourful and/or eccentric personalities to show us all how our gardens could and should look. And then there is the multiplicity of books, periodicals and videos to further reinforce our interest. So, it would now seem opportune to view more deeply this overwhelming preoccupation and to see where it all began.

There is evidence from as far back as the Palaeolithic period, that early man had knowledge of many plants derived from food gathering techniques. Different sorts of fruits, nuts and roots were gathered up but not yet at that time, cultivated. Moving forward to around 4000 BC, we are told that there were managed woodlands in England. A thousand years later and the Egyptians were employing extensive irrigation techniques and cultivating garden art. One of the most famous examples in history, and indeed one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, is that of the Hanging Gardens at Babylon built by slaves and peasants under the direction of King Nebuchadnezzar II. In 87 BC, the Chinese Emperor Wu Ti built a royal park and gardens and in the year 250, not to be outdone, the ever industrious and innovative Romans were actively exchanging information on agriculture, horticulture, animal husbandry, hydraulics and botany. Seeds and plants were also widely shared between them.

The Japanese too had become great practitioners in the art of gardening and from 1450, we learn that the Emperor Yoshimasa decreed that flower arrangement would become part of the nation's universal education. 1730 saw the opening of one of England's most famous and universally renowned centres, Kew Gardens and in 1804, the Royal Horticultural Society is established. Throughout the nineteenth century it seems there were manuals, papers and scholarly books being written to cover every aspect of gardening.

We should not overlook the great gardeners whose names have become synonymous with the magnificent gardens that we still enjoy today, names such as Andre Le Notre, Capability Brown and Inigo Jones. All men you will have noticed and it seems that after examining records over the centuries, a female name is the exception rather than the rule. So, to redress the balance and to acknowledge the valiant efforts of housewives everywhere, we dedicate our anthology of music to them, not forgetting, of course, their other halves who aid and abet them.


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